Volunteer with Susan G. Komen® St. Louis

WebBanner_Volunteer_0915Use your talents in our promise to save lives and end breast cancer forever.

If you have a few hours a year, a few hours a month or a few hours a week to volunteer with Komen St. Louis, we have a place for you. Every minute you spend helping gives another minute of hope to those affected by breast cancer.

Special volunteer opportunities include Dine Out for the Cure Ambassadors, Trivia Night Planning Committee members and Wacoal Fit for the Cure volunteers.

Learn more about volunteering with Komen St. Louis.

Komen St. Louis’ 2015 Volunteer of the Year: Renee Hall

Komen St. Louis has a small (but mighty) staff of just four people. We would not be where we are today without the extensive help of our amazing volunteers. Whether it’s a contribution of one hour or many hours of time, we appreciate the support of all of our volunteers who join us in the year-round fight against breast cancer.

Renee Hall accepts the 2015 Komen St. Louis Volunteer of the Year Award from Komen St. Louis Executive Director Helen Chesnut

Renee Hall accepts the 2015 Komen St. Louis Volunteer of the Year Award from Komen St. Louis Executive Director Helen Chesnut

The recipient of the 2015 Komen St. Louis Volunteer of the Year Award, presented at our 6th Annual Power of the Promise luncheon, is the embodiment of the passion and drive that is needed to beat breast cancer.

Renee Ribble Hall has given countless hours and invaluable service to Komen St. Louis. She has been with our organization since the very beginning — as a member of the Junior League that completed the application for the inaugural Susan G. Komen St. Louis Race for the Cure and as a member of the first Board of Directors for Komen St. Louis.

Since then, she has filled many roles for Komen St. Louis: Race Director, Race Co-Chair, Board Member, Board President. Her strong passion for the cause has motivated her to make a difference and take the lead.

At the Komen St. Louis Race, she is always one of the first people on the Race site and one of the last to leave.

She has given countless hours and invaluable service in support of the Komen St. Louis mission. She is an inspiration.

Thank you for your long-standing dedication to Komen St. Louis, Renee!

Komen St. Louis’ 2014 Volunteer of the Year: Kim Naumann

At Komen St. Louis, we truly appreciate our volunteers, who devote their time and their passion to the fight against breast cancer throughout the year.

The recipient of the 2014 Komen St. Louis Volunteer of the Year Award is someone who provides invaluable, year-round volunteer service.

Kim Naumann, Komen St. Louis' 2014 Volunteer of the Year

Kim Naumann, Komen St. Louis’ 2014 Volunteer of the Year

Kim Naumann began her involvement with our organization by participating in the second Komen St. Louis Race for the Cure and then forming a Race team the next year in support of a coworker.

A few years later, wanting to do more to support the Komen mission, she volunteered to contribute her particular skill sets.

Ever since then, she has served Komen St. Louis as our key website manager and IT volunteer.

In addition to helping us almost every day, Kim goes beyond this volunteer role by serving on committees for Komen St. Louis events, including the Race for the Cure Steering Committee, Spare Nothing for the Cure and Power of a Promise.

It was a pleasure to present this award to Kim at our 5th Annual Power of a Promise luncheon in May.

Thank you, Kim!

I Race for My Family

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Mindy and her family

I race so my mom, my daughter and everyone else in my family have hope of a world free of breast cancer.

– Mindy Bucher, Komen St. Louis Volunteer

Join us for the 16th Annual Susan G. Komen St. Louis Race for the Cure on Saturday, June 14. Visit www.komenstlouis.org.

Why do you race? Share your story: prstories@komenstlouis.org.

Daughter, Co-Survivor, Volunteer

The strength of the bond between mother and daughter can be tested when one is facing a breast cancer diagnosis. As an only child, Stacy Kingston felt a great deal of emotion back in 1998 after learning that her mother, Marcia Luck, was diagnosed with breast cancer.

“She went through the diagnosis, most of her treatments and then when she had about four radiation treatments left she told me she had it,” says Stacy, who was away at college at the time. “I went home one weekend to go to a wedding and as I was getting ready she said, ‘Oh and by the way, I have breast cancer.’”

Stacy’s mother has been the only one in her family with breast cancer. There was so much to find out about the disease, especially with it hitting so close to home. Once Stacy was informed about her mother’s new journey, she was able to truly be there for her.

“I did go to her last treatment with her, which was very hard and also exciting. I was proud of her because she got to ring the bell and now she has been cancer-free for 15 years,” says Stacy.

After going through the breast cancer journey with her mother, Stacy chose to take action in the fight against breast cancer by volunteering for Komen St. Louis. As a Komen volunteer, Stacy has been able to learn more about breast cancer and speak with others who have gone through a similar journey.

Komen St. Louis volunteer Stacy Kingston with her mother Marcia Luck

Komen St. Louis volunteer Stacy Kingston with her mother Marcia Luck

“For a long time I really didn’t get all the details of my mom’s journey through it. Talking with people and hearing their stories and the things that they’re going through has helped,” says Stacy.

Stacy has been involved with Komen St. Louis for 10 years. During her time as a volunteer, she has been able to inspire and encourage others with breast cancer. She’s currently serving as chairperson for Komen St. Louis’ 5th Annual Spare Nothing for the Cure bowling event.

As the daughter of a breast cancer survivor, Stacy understands the power of community, especially during the difficult moments of the disease. She shares a few encouraging words for those acting as a support system for someone going through this journey:

“I would say it’s important to be strong and to educate yourself. Whether it’s getting pamphlets and reading things on the Internet or in magazine articles, or contacting Komen St. Louis for information and resources…make sure you’re educated about breast cancer,” says Stacy. “It’s also important to take care of yourself as well, because you’ve got to take care of yourself in order to help take care of somebody else.”

It takes a caring person to help someone else. After brushing up on facts about breast cancer and taking care of oneself, one of the best things to do is just be there for that person.

“Be in tune with the person you are helping through the process. Some people talk about it, some people want a shoulder to cry on and just to be listened to,” says Stacy. “Figure out what that other person needs, because that’s the biggest way that you’re going to be able to be strong for them as they’re dealing with breast cancer.”

Survivor, in Training

Guest Writer: Lorry Blath, Breast Cancer Survivor and Komen St. Louis Volunteer

When I was two years out from my breast cancer diagnosis, I received an email from Komen St. Louis regarding a two-day workshop for the Research Advocacy Committee. Enthused by all the possible activities and experiences, I became a regular at the meetings. Since that first event, I’ve reviewed grants, attended several national medical meetings, made arrangements for speakers, and organized workshops and educational events.

When I passed the five-year survival mark, my daughter Lisa organized a team of 20 to walk the Susan G. Komen 3-Day, which is 60 miles of walking over the course of three consecutive days. My first reaction: “Sixty miles?!” Then I joined them on “Team Boobiful.” Sadly, days previous to our walk, Lisa, then 35, was also diagnosed with breast cancer – and went on to lead her team with much enthusiasm and joy. We’ve participated in the 3-Day walk for four years in four cities.

I’m approaching my 10-year mark as a breast cancer survivor, and Lisa is past five years.

Lorry Blath (center) with two of her No Boundaries 5K training teammates, Helen Chesnut and Kris Fleming

Lorry Blath (center) with two of her No Boundaries 5K training teammates, Helen Chesnut and Kris Fleming

Now I’m signed up for the 15th Annual Komen St. Louis Race for the Cure – as a timed runner! I’m training through the No Boundaries program, which eases you into the racing process and before you know it, you are running three miles. I’ll compete as one of the oldest and slowest, but the important thing is that I will be healthy and strong for my 10th anniversary as a survivor.

I’ve been co-chairing the Komen St. Louis Research Advocacy Committee for several years now and have met amazingly dedicated volunteers and staff. I’m heartened and motivated and want everyone to know what an extraordinary group of people comprise the Komen St. Louis Affiliate.

Happy 15th Race!

Why I Volunteer for Komen St. Louis

Guest Writer: Kris Fleming, Komen St. Louis Volunteer

I began my involvement with Susan G. Komen St. Louis through my sorority, Zeta Tau Alpha.

ZTA has provided support for Komen since 1992, and is a sponsor of the Komen Race for the Cure® National Series Breast Cancer Survivor Recognition Program. Local ZTA alumnae and collegiate members have supported the Komen St. Louis Race from day one, and I have volunteered at every Race.

Kris Fleming has volunteered with Komen St. Louis since the inaugural Komen St. Louis Race in 1999

Kris Fleming has volunteered with Komen St. Louis since the inaugural Komen St. Louis Race in 1999

I have been a volunteer, committee chair and Race chair, and at every level, I’ve heard stories from so many people about how much Komen means to them.

When a woman is in tears because she is asking for a pink T-shirt for the first time, and you tell her how proud she must be to be a survivor… you know you are doing something good.

When working alongside another volunteer who mentions she’s a breast cancer survivor and has never told anyone, but seeing the sea of pink at the Race makes her realize that she does have a support system… you know you are doing something good.

When a woman is speechless as she is walking in the Race but wants someone to know how honored she is that thousands of participants are there to fight the disease she is also fighting… you know you are doing something good.

When your own family member is diagnosed with breast cancer at an early stage, thanks to a mammogram funded by money you helped raise… you know you are doing something good.

Even when a friend is battling metastatic breast cancer and is able to receive new treatments because of research Komen has funded… you know you are doing something good.

After you’ve been a volunteer for 14 years, your mom calls you when you’re on vacation to tell you she had her annual mammogram and they have found something, and you’re able to put her in touch with someone who helps her make the doctors’ appointments and supports her as she makes treatment decisions… you know you are doing something good.

For all these reasons and so many more, I continue to volunteer with Komen St. Louis and to support all this organization does to make the lives of women diagnosed with breast cancer better. I may have started off volunteering for a cause that I believe in, but until my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer it had never been this personal.

I volunteer because I have seen firsthand how the money raised by Komen supports so many women and families battling this disease. Komen is more than funding mammograms, education and research. Komen is also about giving women hope…hope that they can fight this disease and know they are not alone.