Breast Cancer Research: Susan G. Komen® Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center

2015KomenNCR-NBCAMGraphicFaceookCover-ResearchSince 2007, Susan G. Komen® has invested more than $7.5 million to support the Susan G. Komen® Tissue Bank at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center – the only healthy breast tissue repository in the world. By studying normal tissue, the tissue bank accelerates research on the causes and prevention of breast cancer.

To more deeply understand the evolution of the disease, it is necessary to compare abnormal, cancerous tissue against normal, healthy tissue. By providing researchers with high quality normal breast tissue and matched serum, plasma and DNA, the Komen Tissue Bank accelerates research for the causes and prevention of breast cancer.

Learn more about the Komen Tissue Bank: http://komentissuebank.iu.edu/

We are celebrating National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Connect with and follow Komen St. Louis and use #Komen365 to join in the conversation.

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Breast Cancer Research: Research Advocacy

2015KomenNCR-NBCAMGraphicFaceookCover-ResearchAt Susan G. Komen®, we have a unique community of dedicated volunteer research advocates, who, through our Advocates in Science (AIS) program, work to reduce the burden of breast cancer in their communities.

Research advocates bring the patient’s voice to research, ensuring that the unique and valuable perspectives of breast cancer patients, survivors and co-survivors are integrated into the scientific dialogue and decisions, which impact progress toward ending breast cancer.

Research advocates play a variety of roles throughout the research process. Advocates do everything from educating others about research to participating in research grant peer reviews and working with or as part of scientific teams to help prioritize, develop and implement research projects.

To learn more and to join the program:

http://ww5.komen.org/WhatWeDo/WeFundResearch/BringingthePatientVoicetoResearch/BringingthePatientVoicetoResearch.html

We are celebrating National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Connect with and follow Komen St. Louis and use #Komen365 to join in the conversation.

 

Breast Cancer Research: Young Researchers

2015KomenNCR-NBCAMGraphicFaceookCover-ResearchSusan G. Komen® continues to look to the future of breast cancer research by supporting early career scientists and developing the next generation of leaders in breast cancer research and clinical care.

Recalling our history, you’ll find Komen’s promise to “energize the science” has included funding young investigators since 1990. Now, some of those first young investigators are some of the best “seasoned” breast cancer researchers in the world. They are dedicated to Komen and breast cancer research and are now guiding new young minds to join them.

The field of breast cancer research has consistently attracted new minds to the pursuit of the cures. Unfortunately, with lagging funding everywhere and fewer jobs available, it is hard to keep young scientists in the field of breast cancer research. Without these future leaders and a dedicated workforce, our progress against the disease will not happen. That’s where the Komen Research Program comes in – by providing critical funding that supports the continued research, and thus the continued careers, of these promising scientists. But, we need everyone to help raise the dollars to fund the research.

Research is our investment in the future for our children and friends, an investment in a future without breast cancer.

Learn more about how Komen funds research: http://ww5.komen.org/WhatWeDo/WeFundResearch/HowWeFundResearch/HowWeFundResearch.html

We are celebrating National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Connect with and follow Komen St. Louis and use #Komen365 to join in the conversation.

Breast Cancer Research: Triple Negative Breast Cancer

2015KomenNCR-NBCAMGraphicFaceookCover-ResearchAbout 15 to 20 percent of breast cancers diagnosed today in the U.S. are triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). These tumors tend to occur more often in younger women and African-American women.

Women who carry a mutated BRCA1 gene tend to have breast cancers that are triple negative. Triple negative tumors are often aggressive. Today there are no targeted therapies specifically for TNBC. However, triple negative breast cancer can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. More research is needed to better understand how this cancer develops and how it can be treated more effectively. And that is what Susan G. Komen® is doing.

Komen has invested more than $80 million in more than 115 research grants focused on triple negative breast cancer since it was first identified as a distinct type of breast cancer in 2006. This research has helped us to understand that:

  • There are at least 6 different subtypes of TNBC, each with different abnormalities, which may be treated using drugs that are specific to these abnormalities.
  • A combination of a new drug called a PARP inhibitor plus standard chemotherapy may be more effective at killing TNBC than chemotherapy alone.
  • A blood test that measures the presence of a specific set of genes may be used to identify TNBC patients with BRCA mutations, resulting in earlier intervention and improved treatment.

Learn more: http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/TripleNegativeBreastCancer.html

and

http://ww5.komen.org/uploadedFiles/Content/ResearchGrants/GrantPrograms/TNBCFINAL.pdf

We are celebrating National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Connect with and follow Komen St. Louis and use #Komen365 to join in the conversation.

Breast Cancer Research: Clinical Trials

2015KomenNCR-NBCAMGraphicFaceookCover-ResearchWhen it comes to cancer, clinical trials are one of the biggest reasons we’ve seen gains in breast cancer survival over the past 30 years. And improved survival hasn’t been the only benefit.

Quality of life for people living with cancer has also improved as trials have helped identify more targeted treatments that can help limit many of the side effects of cancer therapies.

Most of us have heard the term “clinical trials” but haven’t given it much thought. Like a lot of important things that fly under the radar, clinical trials have had a huge impact on society.

At their most basic, clinical trial studies done in people test the safety and effectiveness of ways to prevent, detect or treat disease. Participants may benefit from clinical trials themselves, or their participation may benefit others in the future. They are the first to receive new treatments under investigation and, in cancer clinical trials, are guaranteed to receive the best standard care possible. And, clinical trials offer a way for women with breast cancer to play an active role in their own health care and help others by adding to medical research.

For clinical trials of new cancer treatments, there are four main types of trials, though there can be some overlap between types depending on the study.

Phase 1 (phase I): Trials that test to see if a new treatment is safe to use over a range of doses.

Phase 2 (phase II): Trials that test to see how well a new treatment works on a certain type of cancer.

Phase 3 (phase III): Trials that test to see how well a new treatment (including surgical procedures) works compared to the best standard treatment (standard of care).

Phase 4 (phase IV): Trials study the long-term side effects of treatments or answer new questions about treatment. They are done after a new breast cancer treatment is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

There are many sources you can use for finding clinical trials. Each is a little different and some allow searching for trials based on factors like age, gender, breast cancer history, treatment history and geographic area as well as study-type preferences. For example, BreastCancerTrials.org in collaboration with Susan G. Komen®, offers a custom matching service that can help you find a clinical trial that fits your health needs. Though these sites can be helpful search tools, the best approach is to ask your health care provider or local medical center for help finding an appropriate clinical trial.

Learn more: http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/ClinicalTrials.html
and
http://ww5.komen.org/WhatWeDo/WeFundResearch/ClinicalTrialsWeAreFunding/ClinicalTrialsWeAreFunding.html

We are celebrating National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Connect with and follow Komen St. Louis and use #Komen365 to join in the conversation.

Breast Cancer Research: Progress Toward the Cures

2015KomenNCR-NBCAMGraphicFaceookCover-ResearchBecause of medical research leading to effective treatments and earlier diagnosis, the death rate for breast cancer is 34 percent lower than it was 25 years ago. Today, more than 3 million people in the U.S. are breast cancer survivors. Susan G. Komen®’s investment in medical research over the past 30 years has contributed to many of the advances that now help women and men affected by breast cancer live longer and healthier lives.

Major changes have had an impact, including:

  • Increase in awareness, screening and early detection
  • Less invasive surgery
  • Improvements in breast reconstruction
  • More effective chemotherapy
  • More effective hormonal therapy
  • Development and use of targeted therapy
  • Extended survival and better tolerated treatment for metastatic disease
  • Dramatic changes in quality of life for survivors
  • Widespread option for breast-conserving surgery
  • Extensive use of sentinel node biopsy

Learn more about Komen’s research accomplishments:

http://ww5.komen.org/WhatWeDo/WeFundResearch/ResearchAccomplishments/ResearchAccomplishments.html

We are celebrating National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Connect with and follow Komen St. Louis and use #Komen365 to join in the conversation.

Breast Cancer Research: Komen’s Impact

2015KomenNCR-NBCAMGraphicFaceookCover-ResearchResearch is one of our best weapons against breast cancer. Over the past 30 years, it has fueled our knowledge of breast cancer and helped us understand that breast cancer is not just a single disease but many diseases, unique to each individual.

Susan G. Komen® funds more breast cancer research than any other private nonprofit, while also delivering real-time help to those facing the disease. Since 1982, Komen has funded more than $847 million in research. Thanks to the generosity of donors and supporters, Komen is funding lifesaving research in all areas of breast cancer, from basic biology to prevention to treatment and to survivorship.

With continued support, this scientific research will address some of the most pressing issues in breast cancer today:

  • Identifying and improving methods of early detection
  • Ensuring more accurate diagnoses
  • Developing new approaches to prevention
  • Enabling personalized treatments based on breast cancer subtypes and the genetic make-up of a tumor

Komen also continues to support all levels of breast cancer researchers, from established investigators and leaders in the field to young scientists and clinicians who will serve as the next generation of leaders. And our research dollars help support not only scientific research and clinical trials, but also research partnerships and collaborations, scientific conferences and research education.

Read more about the impact of Komen-funded research:

http://ww5.komen.org/WhatWeDo/WeFundResearch/WeFundResearch.html

We are celebrating National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Connect with and follow Komen St. Louis and use #Komen365 to join in the conversation.