Early Birds Save $5!

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Registration for the 2017 Susan G. Komen Greater St. Louis Race for the Cure is open! Register through February 14, 2017, and save $5!

http://www.komenmissouri.org/STLRace

 

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Komen Greater St. Louis Race 2017: Team Captain Training

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It’s Time for 2017 Team Captain Training!

Team Captain Training
Saturday, Feb. 18 @ 11:30 am – 1 pm
Susan G. Komen Missouri Office
9288 Dielman Industrial Drive
St. Louis, MO 63132

Team Captain Training
Saturday, March 11 @ 9-10:30 am
Susan G. Komen Missouri Office
9288 Dielman Industrial Drive
St. Louis, MO 63132

Our Team Captain Training sessions are designed to prepare new and returning Team Captains for the 2017 Komen Greater St. Louis Race for the Cure®. We’ll help you get set for success in your support of Komen Missouri’s mission to save lives and end breast cancer forever.

This training will serve as a great opportunity for new and experienced team captains to:

– Get information on team member recruitment/registration, team fundraising events and more!
– Share fundraising ideas and get new tips
– Be ready to inspire your team members to be More Than Pink!

New and returning team captains should plan to attend one session for the entire time period.

Registration for the June 10, 2017 Komen Greater St. Louis Race for the Cure is open! Register through Feb. 14 and save $5! www.komenmissouri.org/STLRace

Questions? Contact teams@komenmissouri.org

Collaboration: Global

how-we-collaborate-mtp-pinkTo maximize success, sustainability and local ownership of programs, we work with the community, for the community. We assess and base interventions in evidence and innovation; and we invest in systems change or in programs that can be sustained by the community in the long term.

Komen works in 4 regions: Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Asia (China), the Middle East and Europe. In these communities, we support programs that incrementally build capacity for the delivery of breast cancer education, timely screening, diagnostic, treatment and supportive care integrated with existing health services.

A prime example of Komen’s global collaborations is the Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon Initiative in Africa:

Breast and cervical cancers take a particularly devastating toll on women in developing countries. In fact, they’re the leading causes of cancer deaths among women in sub-Saharan Africa. Komen is partnering with numerous U.S. and African organizations and working to put an end to these cancer deaths.

Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon (PRRR) was cofounded in September 2011 by Susan G. Komen®, the George W. Bush Institute, the U.S. Presidents’ Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).

PRRR aims to cost-effectively integrate cervical and breast cancer services into existing health service delivery platforms, beginning by leveraging the PEPFAR infrastructure for HIV/AIDS. Programs are active in Zambia and Tanzania.

Susan G. Komen’s/PRRR’S overarching global objective is to save the lives of women diagnosed with breast cancer by down-staging the disease at diagnosis and facilitating access to timely treatment. Early stage diagnosis of breast cancer is associated with significantly improved treatment outcomes.

In Zambia, Komen supports a collaborative training and technical support program between the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Trainings on health promotion, clinical breast examination and ultrasound, to name a few, are adapted to the local setting and delivered by capable and qualified health professionals in-country. Additionally, through our efforts, Komen has supported the establishment of two breast cancer clinics at the African Center of Excellence in Lusaka and the Kabwe General Hospital in Kabwe, Central Province.

In Tanzania, Komen works closely with the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly & Children to implement strategies to improve breast cancer education, screening and treatment for the community. Komen has developed educational materials in Swahili and is working with the Ministry on early detection guidelines.

Learn more: http://ww5.komen.org/WhatWeDo/AroundtheWorld/Africa/Africa.html

Breast Cancer Research: Komen’s Impact

bc-research-mtp-pinkResearch is one of our best weapons against breast cancer. Over the past 30 years, it has fueled our knowledge of breast cancer and helped us understand that breast cancer is not just a single disease but many diseases, unique to each individual.

Susan G. Komen® funds more breast cancer research than any other private nonprofit, while also delivering real-time help to those facing the disease. Since 1982, Komen has funded more than $920 million in research in 48 states and 21 countries. Thanks to the generosity of donors and supporters, Komen is funding lifesaving research in all areas of breast cancer, from basic biology to prevention to treatment and to survivorship.

With continued support, this scientific research will address some of the most pressing issues in breast cancer today:

  • Identifying and improving methods of early detection
  • Ensuring more accurate diagnoses
  • Enabling personalized treatments based on breast cancer subtypes and the genetic make-up of a tumor
  • Understanding why some tumors metastasize, and others don’t

Komen also continues to support all levels of breast cancer researchers, from established investigators and leaders in the field to young scientists and clinicians who will serve as the next generation of leaders. And our research dollars help support not only scientific research and clinical trials, but also research partnerships and collaborations, scientific conferences and research education.

Read more about the impact of Komen-funded research:

http://ww5.komen.org/WhatWeDo/WeFundResearch/WeFundResearch.html

Understanding Breast Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

No one knows more about your body than you do – not your partner, not your parents, not even your doctor. So when you talk with a health care provider about your health, remember that you have valuable information to share. You know about changes in your body and about any problems you may be having. Share that information. Open and honest communication between you and your doctor is one of the best ways to make sure you get the care you deserve.

To get the most out of each doctor’s visit, try following these guidelines:

  1. Be prepared. It is often helpful to gather information about your health concerns — from the library (books and medical journals), trusted Internet sites, etc. The more you know, the more comfortable you will be talking to your doctor.
  1. Organize your questions ahead of time. You should be able to talk openly and honestly with your doctor about breast health and breast cancer to make sure all of your questions are answered. To help you get started, Susan G. Komen® has a series of 17 Questions to Ask the Doctor topic cards on a variety of breast cancer issues. Each card contains important questions to discuss with your doctor. Space is provided for you to jot down the answers. Also, be sure to bring a voice recorder to capture your conversation so you can refer back to your doctor’s responses. These questions will help your doctor understand and address your specific concerns. You can download and print these cards to take to your next doctor’s appointment at www.komen.org/questions.
  1. Tell your story. When your doctor comes in, ask if you can take a few minutes to briefly explain your situation and concerns. Be as specific as you can. Then, give the doctor your list of questions and ask them.
  1. Give feedback. If your doctor’s responses were helpful, say so. This kind of feedback will encourage your doctor to talk with you, listen to you and continue to help you. Doctors are just like anyone else; they want to do their job well. That means doing whatever they can to help you stay healthy or to get better. Remember, although doctors may know a great deal about breast health and breast cancer, they may not truly understand or be aware of all that you are going through. You can help your doctor help you by sharing your feelings and concerns.

Learn more: http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/QuestionstoAsktheDoctorPDFDownloads.html?ecid=vanityurl:57

http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/TalkingWithYourDoctor.html

Susan G. Komen Sets Bold Goal to Reduce U.S. Breast Cancer Deaths by 50 Percent in 10 Years

Susan G. Komen® Sets Bold Goal to Reduce U.S. Breast Cancer Deaths by 50 Percent in 10 Years

Plan Targets Health Equity for All, Enhanced Research Focus for Most Lethal Breast Cancers

DALLAS – Sept.13, 2016 – The Susan G. Komen breast cancer organization announced a bold plan today to reduce the nation’s 40,000 breast cancer deaths by 50 percent in 10 years, by improving access to quality and timely cancer care for the underserved and enhancing Komen’s research focus on lethal breast cancers.

“We know that people die of breast cancer for two reasons: a lack of high-quality breast cancer care accessible to everyone, and a lack of treatments for the most aggressive and deadly forms of this disease,” said Dr. Judith A. Salerno, president and CEO of Susan G. Komen. “We are taking direct action designed to solve these problems to reduce breast cancer deaths by half in the U.S. within the next decade.”

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$27 Million Advanced for Health Equity 

Salerno said today that Fund II Foundation made a grant worth approximately $27 million for a  program initially targeting 10 metropolitan areas to significantly reduce what she called the “appalling” difference in death rates between African-American and white women. African-American women are nearly 40 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than white women; in some cities, that gap is as high as 74 percent.

“This constitutes a public health crisis that must be addressed, first in the cities where these death rates are highest, and then in all areas of the country,” Salerno said.

Salerno thanked Fund II Foundation for the grant that makes the initiative possible. “The generosity of Fund II Foundation will save lives,” Salerno said. “We are humbled by the faith that Fund II Foundation has placed in this initiative and its interest in ensuring health equity for African-American citizens.”

Fund II Foundation President, Robert F. Smith said, “No longer should African-American women be more likely to die from a breast cancer diagnosis than others. Through this grant supporting Susan G. Komen, Fund II Foundation will help address these unfair disparities across our country.”

Komen’s African-American Health Equity Initiative targets cities where mortality rates and late-stage diagnosis of African-American women are highest. The goal: to reduce the mortality gap by 25 percent within five years of beginning work in each city.

The initial targeted cities are Memphis, Tenn., St. Louis, Mo., Dallas, Los Angeles, Virginia Beach, Va., Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia.  Baltimore and Detroit have been identified as high-priority areas as the program expands over the next year.

The African-American Health Equity Initiative supplements the work that Komen and its network of 100 U.S. Affiliates already are doing to remove barriers to cancer care. Komen and Komen Affiliates support thousands of local programs that provide screenings, treatment assistance, emergency financial aid, medical supplies and living expense for underserved individuals.

The organization has invested more than $2 billion over 34 years for these programs aimed at uninsured, under-insured, and medically vulnerable populations.

“We will never waver from our commitment to remove barriers of language, geography, economics or culture for all people facing this disease.  Every woman or man must be able to access and receive high-quality breast health and breast cancer care, be supported through their treatment and into survivorship,” Salerno said.

Research

The second prong of Komen’s plan enhances Komen’s focus on aggressive forms of breast cancer and metastatic disease (stage IV or cancer that has spread to other parts of the body).

As the largest nonprofit funder of breast cancer research (investing more than $920 million since inception), Komen has funded nearly $160 million in metastatic disease research since its founding. Komen has funded another $110 million in research on aggressive forms of breast cancer – such as triple negative, inflammatory breast cancer and hormone-positive forms of breast cancer – that are resistant to standard treatments.

“The majority of breast cancer deaths are from metastatic breast cancer. We also know that aggressive forms of breast cancer are more likely to recur and spread, so we are focusing our efforts in both of these areas,” Salerno said.

The new initiative aims to advance research into new treatments for aggressive and metastatic disease. Komen also will seek to leverage next-generation technology that can detect breast cancer at its very earliest stages to prevent recurrence and metastasis.

Progress to Date

Salerno said Komen’s bold goal builds on the progress of the breast cancer movement since Komen was founded in 1982. “Death rates from breast cancer have declined by 37 percent since 1990. We have more treatments than at any time in our history. We’ve come a very long way from a time when breast cancer couldn’t be discussed publicly. Our new bold goal requires us to take a deeper dive and stretch further to ensure that every woman or man can be told, ‘There is help and hope for you.’”

About Susan G. Komen®

Susan G. Komen is the world’s largest breast cancer organization, funding more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit outside of the federal government while providing real-time help to those facing the disease. Since its founding in 1982, Komen has funded more than $920 million in research and provided more than $2 billion in funding to screening, education, treatment and psychosocial support programs serving millions of people in more than 30 countries worldwide. Komen was founded by Nancy G. Brinker, who promised her sister, Susan G. Komen, that she would end the disease that claimed Suzy’s life. Visit komen.org or call 1-877 GO KOMEN. Connect with us on social at ww5.komen.org/social.

About Fund II Foundation

Fund II Foundation makes grants to 501(c)(3) public charities in five areas:  1) preservation of the African-American experience, 2) safeguarding human dignity by giving a voice to the voiceless and promoting human rights 3) improving environmental conservation and providing outdoor education that enables people of all ages and backgrounds to enjoy the numerous benefits of the great outdoors 4) facilitating music education, particularly in primary and secondary schools, to nourish both the mind and the soul 5) and sustaining the uniquely American values of entrepreneurship, empowerment, innovation and security.  For more information on Fund II Foundation, visit www.fund2foundation.org.

 

Give Strength on #GivingTuesday

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As you look ahead to the holidays, please take a moment to help give strength to the local fight against breast cancer. That’s the spirit of #GivingTuesday – to pause and add deeper meaning to the holidays by giving to a cause that’s important to you.

Please consider a gift to Susan G. Komen Missouri in honor of #GivingTuesday. Your gift helps us save lives in our 38-county Missouri/Illinois service area.

With your gift, we can offer assistance to individuals and families facing breast cancer in your community. Plus, you can help us support research to find better treatments and to find the cures.

Give a gift today.